James Webb Telescope discovers many stars in galaxy’s black hole

The James Webb Telescope, which began science operations last month, has managed to observe the galaxy from a distance of 500 light years. Along with this, it has also come to the fore that such loud sounds are coming. The world’s most powerful telescope has returned images of stellar gymnastics taking place in the deep […]
 


James Webb Telescope discovers many stars in galaxy’s black hole

The James Webb Telescope, which began science operations last month, has managed to observe the galaxy from a distance of 500 light years. Along with this, it has also come to the fore that such loud sounds are coming.

The world’s most powerful telescope has returned images of stellar gymnastics taking place in the deep universe, revealing how the Milky Way has changed over billions of years. The galaxy appears as a sphere, resulting from a high-speed collision between a larger spiral galaxy and a smaller galaxy not seen in this image.

The Cartwheel Galaxy is going through a transition phase and astronomers say it was once a spiral like Milky Way, but is and will continue to undergo chaotic changes due to collisions with smaller galaxies.

The collision notably affected the shape and structure of the Milky Way. The cartwheel galaxy has two rings – a bright inner ring and a surrounding, colored ring. “These two rings extend outward from the center of the collision, like ripples after a rock falls in a pond,” NASA said in a statement.

The James Webb Telescope, located about 15,00,000 km from Earth, is going back in time to observe the origin of the universe about 13 billion years ago. The spacecraft has once again performed beyond expectations, showing a huge difference in image quality and complexity. The details it collects are compared to those of Hubble, which has also observed the Cartwheel Galaxy in the past. The spacecraft used its near-infrared camera (NIRCam) to observe critical wavelengths of light, which can reveal more stars than are observed in visible light.

The galaxy displays several distinct blue dots, which are isolated stars or pockets of star formation, NASA said. NIRCam also reveals differences in dense dust in the core and irregular shapes associated with young stellar populations outside, compared to the smooth distribution or shape of older stellar populations.

Meanwhile, Webb’s Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) has revealed regions of hydrocarbons and other chemical compounds as well as silicate dust, similar to much dust on Earth, within the Cartwheel Galaxy. “These regions form a series of spiraling spokes that essentially make up the skeleton of the galaxy,” NASA said in a statement. These spokes are evident in previous Hubble observations released in 2018, but they are rarely visible in this Web image.” Be more prominent,” NASA said in a statement.