Set AC below 27 degree Celsius or pay Rs 5 lakh fine: This country asks offices, airports and restaurants to maintain temperature till 2023

New Delhi: As Europe grapples with hotter temperatures and exorbitant energy prices, Spain has issued a new directive allowing public places including offices, shops, bars, theatres, airports and train stations to set air conditioners at 27 °C or higher. been asked to do. The decree was published in the official state gazette and is due […]
 


Set AC below 27 degree Celsius or pay Rs 5 lakh fine: This country asks offices, airports and restaurants to maintain temperature till 2023

New Delhi: As Europe grapples with hotter temperatures and exorbitant energy prices, Spain has issued a new directive allowing public places including offices, shops, bars, theatres, airports and train stations to set air conditioners at 27 °C or higher. been asked to do. The decree was published in the official state gazette and is due to come into force next week.

 

The Verge reported that the rules include maintaining a temperature of 19 degrees Celsius or less in winter and will remain in place until at least November 2023. The report claimed that the government has decided to impose fines of up to 600,000 euros (approximately Rs 5 lakh) for defaulters.

 

 

Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has said publicly that the country urgently needs to save energy, even encouraging office workers to sever their ties to help them stay calm without artificial aid. . “I have told ministers and bosses in the public and private sector not to wear a tie unless it is necessary,” he was quoted as saying at a press conference last week.

Earlier last month, countries such as Greece and Italy announced measures to restrict energy use when cooling public buildings, requiring air conditioning to be set to 27 degrees Celsius or higher.

In addition, France ordered public premises to exceed thermostats in summer and lower in winter and air-conditioned businesses to be fined 750 euros (about $764) if they leave their doors open.

In addition, the government is targeting a 10% reduction in energy use by 2024 with the “Energy Restraint” campaign. Mayors are also fighting their own battles against waste, fined for air-conditioned or heated shops that leave front doors open; Others are working to limit the pain of rising energy prices.

The 8,000 residents of Aureilhan, in the foothills of the Pyrenees in southwestern France, have been adjusting to nights without street lights since July 11. Extinguishing all 1,770 of them from 11 a.m. to 6 a.m. would save money that Mayor Yannick Bauby would spend. roads and other maintenance. Otherwise, he said, the city’s 84,000-euro ($86,000) lighting bill in 2021 would nearly triple next year.

“When it comes down to it, there’s no reason to keep the lights on at night,” he said over the phone. “It’s shaking the way we think.”

The German city of Hanover has also banned the use of mobile air conditioning units and fan heaters everywhere except in hospitals and schools.