Uncertainty ends in Malaysia, Sultan nominates Anwar Ibrahim as new PM, will take oath today

Malaysia’s Sultan Abdullah Ahmad Shah has named Anwar Ibrahim as the country’s new prime minister. Ibrahim’s appointment was decided after consultations in a special meeting with the kings of nine states of the country. This ended the political uncertainty created by the fractured mandate in Malaysia. According to the report, Ibrahim’s nomination was informed in […]
 


Uncertainty ends in Malaysia, Sultan nominates Anwar Ibrahim as new PM, will take oath today

Malaysia’s Sultan Abdullah Ahmad Shah has named Anwar Ibrahim as the country’s new prime minister. Ibrahim’s appointment was decided after consultations in a special meeting with the kings of nine states of the country. This ended the political uncertainty created by the fractured mandate in Malaysia.

According to the report, Ibrahim’s nomination was informed in a statement issued by the Palace. Anwar Ibrahim will be sworn in as the 10th Prime Minister of Malaysia on Thursday at 5 pm local time. Ibrahim will be the 10th Prime Minister of Malaysia.

Anwar Ibrahim is a reformist opposition leader. In the recently held general elections, the Pakatan Harapan coalition led by Anwar won the maximum number of 82 seats. Royal Comptroller Fadli Shamsuddin issued a statement saying that after understanding the views of the Malay rulers, the Sultan had agreed to appoint Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim as the 10th Prime Minister of Malaysia. With this, five days after the general elections in Malaysia, the way to form a new government has been cleared. Ibrahim rose to the position of prime minister in 1998 after being dismissed as deputy prime minister and accused of abuse of power.

Sultan proposes unity government

The announcement about Malaysia’s prime minister came after the majority parties agreed to Sultan Abdullah Ahmad Shah’s proposal to form a unity government. According to media reports, Anwar Ibrahim and his rival Perikatan National (PN) chief Muhyiddin Yassin were unable to garner the support of the 112 MPs needed for a majority in parliament. Subsequently, on Thursday, the United Malays National Organization (UMNO) party expressed its willingness to be part of the unity government, breaking away from its previous stance of being in opposition to the Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition. Other Malaysian political parties also supported the stand taken by UMNO. The PN also announced that it would consider proposing a unity government with like-minded political parties.