Hiroshima Day 2022: 5 facts to know as World War II completes 77 years of atomic bombing

Hiroshima Day 2022 UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres attended the annual ceremony at the Peace Memorial Par in Japan on Saturday. Hiroshima recalls the atomic bombing 77 years ago as officials including the head of the United Nations warned against building nuclear weapons and fears of another such attack escalating amid Russia’s war on Ukraine. “Nuclear […]
 


Hiroshima Day 2022: 5 facts to know as World War II completes 77 years of atomic bombing

Hiroshima Day 2022 UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres attended the annual ceremony at the Peace Memorial Par in Japan on Saturday. Hiroshima recalls the atomic bombing 77 years ago as officials including the head of the United Nations warned against building nuclear weapons and fears of another such attack escalating amid Russia’s war on Ukraine. “Nuclear weapons are rubbish. Guterres, who attended the prayer at Hiroshima Peace Park, said they do not guarantee any security – only death and destruction.

 

Hiroshima Day: Five facts to know

  1. The United States dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, destroying the city and killing 140,000 people. It dropped a second bomb on Nagasaki three days later, killing another 70,000 people. Japan surrendered on 15 August, ending World War II and Japan’s nearly half-century aggression in Asia.
  2. Many survivors of the bombings suffer permanent injuries and illnesses from exposure to explosions and radiation, and face discrimination in Japanese society.
  3. The government began providing medical aid to certified survivors in 1968, after more than 20 years of effort by them.
  4. According to the Ministry of Health and Welfare, as of March, 127,755 survivors, whose average age is now about 84, are certified as hibakusha and eligible for government medical assistance.
  5. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons came into effect in January 2021, joining several years of civilian effort by nuclear bombing survivors, or hibakusha. But while more than 50 countries have ratified it, the treaty specifically lacks the US and other nuclear powers, as well as Japan, which has relied on the US nuclear umbrella to protect itself since the end of the war. .