Blood sugar test will be done without needle, smart necklace band will do all the work

Washington: Researchers have successfully tested a device that will monitor your health. A team at Ohio State University has developed a battery-free, biochemical sensor that detects blood sugar and glucose levels through the sweat released by humans during exercise, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances. Is. Enjoy 30 minutes of […]
 


Blood sugar test will be done without needle, smart necklace band will do all the work

Washington: Researchers have successfully tested a device that will monitor your health. A team at Ohio State University has developed a battery-free, biochemical sensor that detects blood sugar and glucose levels through the sweat released by humans during exercise, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances. Is.

Enjoy 30 minutes of indoor cycling

The Ohio State team has named this paddle-like device a smart necklace around the neck. During the exercise, the device was worn around the neck, which tracked the participants’ glucose levels. This smart necklace works by using a resonance circuit instead of a battery, which reflects the radio frequency signal sent by an external reader system. After engaging in indoor cycling for 30 minutes, participants cycled for 15 minutes before cycling. One minute break was taken. During this, he drank sweet drinks.

Can track glucose in blood

Researchers knew glucose levels in sweat should rise after drinking sugary beverages, said Xinghua Li, a study co-author and assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State. The question was, will this new sensor detect it? The results showed that the sensor successfully tracked glucose levels, suggesting that it would serve to monitor other important chemicals in sweat.

This will reveal how the brain works

Biomarkers are substances that can reveal the deepest secrets of the body. Evidence of illness, infection, and emotional trauma can also be found in a person’s body fluids, including sweat, tears, saliva, and urine. In addition to analyzing the composition of sweat, the researchers hope that this sensor could one day be adapted. Used to detect bioimplantation and neurotransmitters and hormones that may be associated with secondary brain injury.

sweat will do all the work

Due to the small structure of the sensing interface, this smart necklace requires only a small amount of sweat to operate the interface, Lee said. However, it will take some time before tools such as the prototypes in this study become available to the public. This will be of great benefit to those who are most in need of this potentially life-saving technology.