Milky Way Black Hole: The world’s first captured black hole image of the Milky Way, have you seen these glowing embers

New Delhi: The world on Thursday saw the first glowing but fuzzy image of a black hole at the center of its galaxy. Astronomers believe that this massive black hole is at the center of almost all galaxies, including ours. Light and matter can escape in this black hole. It is very difficult to find […]
 


Milky Way Black Hole: The world’s first captured black hole image of the Milky Way, have you seen these glowing embers

New Delhi: The world on Thursday saw the first glowing but fuzzy image of a black hole at the center of its galaxy. Astronomers believe that this massive black hole is at the center of almost all galaxies, including ours. Light and matter can escape in this black hole. It is very difficult to find his picture in Teva. There the light spreads around under the influence of gravity. These black holes are made of hot gas and dust.

International
The consortium on Thursday unveiled a color photo of the black hole. This image was taken with a Horizon Telescope. The consortium has installed 8 such synchronized radio telescopes in different parts of the world. Sangh had earlier tried to photograph a black hole in its Asha Ganga, but failed.

 

For the first time ever, scientists reveal the image of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way - see photo

Black hole is four million times bigger than the sun
, The Milky Way black hole is called Sagittarius A, meaning Sagittarius A (asterisk), near the border of the constellations Sagittarius and Scorpius. It is 4 million times bigger than our Sun.

 

First picture of second black hole found
But this was not the first black hole picture released by the consortium. Earlier such a picture was released in 2019. The black hole image of a galaxy 53 million light years away was captured at the time. The black hole of our galaxy is about 27,000 light years away from Earth. There are 5.9 trillion mikes (9.5 trillion kilometers) in a light year.

The estimated cost of the consortium’s project is 60 million. Of this, 280 million is being provided by the National Science Foundation of America.