‘Chup: Revenge of the Artist’ Movie Review: OK, Fine, Chup

Suppose I change the headline of the review of this film to ‘Choo…’ and give it one and a half stars. What is the police for my protection, because there is a serial killer out there who kills film critics who are unfair. Actually this is a scene from this film. Only that the film […]
 


Suppose I change the headline of the review of this film to ‘Choo…’ and give it one and a half stars. What is the police for my protection, because there is a serial killer out there who kills film critics who are unfair. Actually this is a scene from this film. Only that the film critic concerned is ethical/without bias. The one who gets killed, on the other hand, is a corrupt man who praised a bad film to the skies and was killed! The manner of the kills is really determined by the review itself.
So, if some guy wrote that in a picture he has a heart, but all other organs are displaced – that’s exactly how you see the dead body of said critic! Anyway, the most common take-down for the movies is it’s loosely edited, so long – it’s often said in reviews that go on and on! I understand.

Silent: Revenge of the Artist

Director: R Balki

Cast: Dulquer Salmaan, Shreya Dhanwantri

Rating: 3.5/5

Frankly, the premise of this serial-killer picture is so horrifyingly ‘delightfully absurd’ that you just fall for the idea, at first — because, how could you not? Going back to the moral critic, the cop (a relatively subdued Sunny Deol) casually asks him if he has seen any movies that might have inspired the mad-killer.
The only vague memory I have of an Oriental short film from around 2006 – it’s mentioned in a review of the anthology, Then Fear Forbidden – in which a dead artist returns as a ghost, with long arms, is walking out of hell. An art critic for Who regularly trashed his works!
For the serial killer here, critics in the film admit, “such a film is not in my knowledge.” which one is right. This is very unique/original.
As is usually the case with writer-director R Balki’s films. This, I suspect, essentially stems from a brief, one-line idea – Amitabh Bachchan as Abhishek’s son(s); Or the ego battle of an actor with his voice-over artist (Shamitabh), who could have been a playback singer as well.
Or, Big B falls in love with a much younger woman in Balki’s debut film Cheeni Kum (2007). It was when a critic trashed that film, that Balki told me recently, that he said aloud to Bachchan, “Can we bump this man up?”
No you can’t – but you sure could make a movie out of it, I guess! Balki’s primary inspiration, Bachchan, appears here on screen to make the necessary balancing point of how “cinema needs fearless, unbiased voices for its growth.” Which is true for all aspects of public life, isn’t it? Popular film criticism is only one part of journalism.
Left to its own devices, what could happen is that the ‘kill the critic’ idea is an absolute hit-job, like the nut-job paparazzi on Nightcrawler (2014). Or even more, an inherently dark, slasher flick, perhaps terrifyingly Korean in its mayhem, descending toward cringe-fun, low-budget B-movie madness. Typical of his style, what Balki tightly weaves around his idea is a lightness of a genuinely mainstream touch – the songs Waqt ne kiya, jaane kya tune kaha in the background score; a beautiful romance in the foreground; A few quirky characters here, some smart lines here; And a really clever sequence leading up to the climax.
Wise actor Dulquer Salmaan, who has the looks of the perfect ‘paavam’ boy – perhaps with something to hide underneath – appears as a flower-seller. Shreya Dhanwantri plays the role of an entertainment reporter. Which makes him the new face of Bombay journalism after the financial scribe in the 1992 scam, If You Can!
We will take him to the pockets of the journalists who have been subdued forever! Pooja Bhatt, returning to the big screen after two decades, plays a psychoanalyst specializing in psycho killers, with a captivating character like herself.
In the distant background, Chup is also framed around the classic Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959), which was a box-office flop upon release – like many great films in its time. This was Guru Dutt’s last film as a director, although he had made ghost-directed films, before his death by suicide.
The tragedy of Kaagaz Ke Phool probably has more to do with the fickle response of the public. I suspect there were too many reviewers to steer public opinion or the picture’s fate. Now, practically anyone with fingers and a cellphone is a film critic. This is what makes Chup a truly well-timed, contemporary film – if you extend its implicit point to the ‘troll culture’ that surrounds us. With people on social media, in particular, mindlessly taking aim at public figures in general, without thinking of how it affects those darts.
I saw film critics in this meta movie as the only one

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