Take action against warnings, deepfakes or risk taking to Google, Facebook, Twitter

Google, Facebook, Twitter and other tech companies must take measures to combat deep and fake accounts on their platforms or risk heavy fines from the European Commission under the Code of Union. The European Commission is expected to publish an updated code of conduct on propaganda on Thursday as part of its crackdown on fake […]
 


Take action against warnings, deepfakes or risk taking to Google, Facebook, Twitter

Google, Facebook, Twitter and other tech companies must take measures to combat deep and fake accounts on their platforms or risk heavy fines from the European Commission under the Code of Union. The European Commission is expected to publish an updated code of conduct on propaganda on Thursday as part of its crackdown on fake news. This voluntary code, introduced in 2018, will now become a co-regulation scheme, sharing responsibility for the code between regulators and signatories (companies).

What are deepfakes?

The term “deepfake” is derived from intensive training, which is a form of AI. Deepfakes use deep-rooted information to create photographs of fake events. These algorithms can teach themselves to solve problems that involve large groups of data. Fake news makers exchange faces and voices in video, images, audio, etc. to create fake content that looks real.

European Commission’s new regulation plan

In 2018, the European Commission introduced a voluntary code, sharing responsibilities between regulators and technology companies to combat fake news. However, this voluntary code is now being updated into a coordination scheme, pointing to examples of problems such as deep fakes and fake accounts that the tech giant will now be forced to deal with.

Companies will have to pay fine

In addition, the code will be included in the European Commission’s strict new rules, known as the DSA or Digital Services Act. The 27 EU member states ratified the new law earlier this year, which also includes a provision to combat misinformation.

According to the DSA, tech companies that fail to comply with the new obligations could face penalties of up to 6% of their global turnover. These companies will have six months to implement their measures after signing up for the code. Code signing companies must also take measures to combat advertising, which includes misinformation and provides greater transparency in political advertising.